Hong Kong phooey. What the big press missed.

Screen Shot 2016-01-27 at 10.51.00 AMEver heard of neural lace? It’s a mesh-like brain implant that actually assimilates with your brain and allows computer/brain interface. It was science fiction until recently, when scientists successfully wired some mice thus. The mice brains actually accepted the mesh, in effect meshing with the mesh.

The long-term implications for humanity: Thought manipulation, performance enhancement, memory sharing, cloud-like applications, disease treatment — a whole spectrum of good and bad outcomes. Anyway, it’s a frontier that Musk sees as inevitable and impactful, effectively evening out the delta between dumb-asses and smart-asses, among other things. “Intelligence augmentation as opposed to artificial intelligence.”

What else did he say in Hong Kong recently? Oh, some stuff about Tesla, most of which went totally unheard by the mainstream press, which chose to write about tunnels and other irrelevancies.

  1. Falcon doors will soon get an OTA update allowing for a 50 to 60 percent opening, to better serve as rain shields.
  2. A truck will probably happen. Does that mean pickup truck? Who knows. Tesla thinks by first principles, not analogies.
  3. The price of gas can go screw itself. “What we aspire to do is make the cars so compelling that even with low gasoline prices, it’s still the car you want to buy.”
  4. Hong Kong should serve as a model for other high-density cities as the world shifts to electric motoring. High-rise dwellings pose an unsolved problem for charging EVs.
  5. Model III: “The most profound car that we make.”
  6. About Chinese competition: “If you’re in a race, don’t worry about what the other runners are doing. Just run.”
  7. But is China tilting the race in favor of the Chinese runner? “I’m trying to figure out there’s any way to answer that and not lose.” He didn’t answer. But he did raise an eyebrow (see photo). We’ve seen that non-verbal cue before. It’s generally affirmative.
  8. On shared mobility versus private car ownership: “I think probably, roughly 60 or 70 percent of people will probably want to own their cars. Or call it two thirds own, one third share. This is a complete shooting in the dark guess . . . They also may choose to add it to the shared fleet and then take it out of the shared fleet at will.”
  9. Autonomy/shared mobility not a threat. “No, as long as we make great autonomous cars. It’s just adding functionality that I think people will consider quite important in the car in the future.”
Screen Shot 2016-01-27 at 10.52.13 AM

Obscure 70s reference. Sorry.

But back to the neural mesh thing. Why use a car at all? You can work from home. You might even be able to control a facsimile of yourself at work, while you’re at home, rearranging your sock drawer.

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5 thoughts on “Hong Kong phooey. What the big press missed.

  1. Michael says:

    Haha, the last part is extremely true if you’ve been to Hong Kong. The subway system is more than adequate for such a small place.

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  2. Terry says:

    ‘Model III: “The most profound car that we make.”‘

    .. missed that quote, though watched entire video yesterday. Encouraging words, and feeling more positive Model III will indeed be showcased on time in March.

    Also Elon’s comment ref truck as logical step was fantastic. His old pal I believe has been trying to get started on electric garbage trucks. Displacing ICE trucks, and buses would be a big step towards cleaner air in our cities.

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  3. RWF says:

    “Profound” comment comes at 12:05

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  4. Terry says:

    Thx, got it. Guess he means ‘profound’ as in ‘mass-production vehicle’, which is u’standable.
    Having recently taken possession of MS car, I say Tesla has already blown my mind.
    Used to covet beamers and porsches.. but no more as they seem so outdated now.

    Like

  5. BEP says:

    @Terry

    Electric buses? Take a look: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLo3Pn4KC3w

    Like

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